Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Perspective: We will not be shaken | Letter

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One way we can remember the victims is to hold a blood drive, and that’s exactly what Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Boston is doing in their honor.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | US Desk
Source/Credit: The Press Enterprise
By Ahsan Jattala | April 23, 2014

Reader Ahsan Jattala says he is still reminded how much the tragedy of the Boston Marathon Bombing affected him, one year later. As a Muslim, he says he is offended that the suspects in the attack claimed that they were Muslim, but did not truly honor the faith. He says this year’s race will be a chance for American’s to show that they will not be oppressed by terrorism.

April 15, 2013, was a day like any other, until I saw a notification that a bombing had occurred in Boston. I read the depressing details and realized how close to the heart this disaster had occurred.

The Boston Marathon bombing tragedy hit rather close to home due to the fact that the bombers claimed they were Muslim and it occurred in my native country, the USA. As a Muslim, this is appalling to me, considering that everything the bombers did were not reflections of Islam in any way. Islam repeatedly states that the killing of innocent people is a major sin, and goes against its teachings of peace.

Indonesia: President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's Pluralist Legacy in Tatters, Survey Confirms

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“There needs to be more courage shown by the president and his ministers in the future to eradicate these discriminatory bylaws.”

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: The Jakarta Globe
By The Jakarta Globe | Apr 23, 2014

Jakarta. As Indonesia debates the merits of the three-decade rule of strongman Suharto, the one thing the country seems to agree on is that the dictator fared better on protecting religious freedoms than the democratically elected incumbent, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.

Fewer that 40 percent of 1,200 Indonesians polled last week said Yudhoyono’s stewardship of the country’s religious pluralism was a success, compared to 45 percent for the late Suharto, according the Indonesian Survey Network, or LSI.

In fact, says LSI researcher Ardian Sopa, Yudhoyono was the worst-scoring president in this regard among the six presidents in Indonesia’s history.

Sukarno, the country’s founding president, came out on top with an approval rating of 65 percent, followed by Abdurrahman “Gus Dur” Wahid with 58 percent, B.J. Habibie with 49 percent and Megawati Soekarnoputri with 44 percent.

Canada passes US in middle-class wealth

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According to a New York Times report, the rich in the US are getting richer, but the poor and middle classes are falling behind some of their Western peers.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch |
Source/Credit: BBC News | Echo Chambers
By BBC | April 22, 2014

Last week we noted that a pair of academic researchers said the US was starting to look less like a democracy and more like an oligarchy, where a wealthy elite determines public policy. Here's another bit of cheer in that regard.

According to a New York Times report, the rich in the US are getting richer, but the poor and middle classes are falling behind some of their Western peers.

"Middle-class incomes in Canada - substantially behind in 2000 - now appear to be higher than in the United States," David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy write. "The poor in much of Europe earn more than poor Americans."

The UK median income is still behind that of the US, but it's catching up fast - a 19.7% increase since 2000. This is the same increase as Canada's, whereas the US number was up by only 0.3%. (It's worth noting that Germany's middle class is also stagnating - at 1.4%.) [ more ... ]

Pakistan: 202 women murdered in the name of honour in Sindh last year

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“The weakness of the legal system and the encouragement of the jirga system in rural areas are both responsible for the rise in the murder of women in the name of honour.”

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: The Express Tribune
By Peer Muhammad | April 21, 2014

ISLAMABAD: In 2013, as many as 202 women were murdered in the name of Karo-kari (honour killing) in Sindh, Special Home Secretary Sindh informed the Senate Functional Committee on Human Rights on Monday.

The secretary also stated that at least 28 honour killing cases have been reported in 2014 thus far.

He added that the incidence of honour killing in interior Sindh is continuously rising because of the jirga system that exists in all districts of the rural parts of the province.

“The weakness of the legal system and the encouragement of the jirga system in rural areas are both responsible for the rise in the murder of women in the name of honour,” the secretary informed.

Bangladesh: No excuse for persecution | Dhaka Tribune Editorial

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We are confident most Bangladeshis, regardless of their faith and background, value the spirit and letter of Bangladesh as a free country which constitutionally guarantees freedoms of belief and religion.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Dhaka Tribune
By Tribune Editorial | April 23, 2014

Comments made against atheists and sects are hateful and should be resisted

The extraordinary demand made by Hefazat Secretary General Junaid Babunagari, that followers of minority Islamic sects such as Ahmadiyya and Ahle Hadith should be banned, and that atheists should not be allowed to live in Bangladesh, cannot be allowed to go unchallenged.

We are confident most Bangladeshis, regardless of their faith and background, value the spirit and letter of Bangladesh as a free country which constitutionally guarantees freedoms of belief and religion. Moreover, many devout Muslims would disagree with such calls on the Quranic basis that there should be no compulsion in religion.

As a religious body, his organisation may be expected by its followers to disagree with or even dislike contrary religious opinions.

Malaysia: Ahmadi Muslim sect only differs in terms of interpretation of Islam

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Though considered deviants by the religious authorities, the sect only differs in terms of interpretation of Islam. 

Anti-Ahmadiyya sign affixed by the Selangor Religious Department at an
Ahmadiyya mosque in Malaysia
Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Free Malaysia Today
By K Pragalath | April 23, 2014

PETALING JAYA: The Ahmadiyya followers in Kampung Nakhoda, Batu Caves, will be charged with conducting prayers in a place not considered a mosque.

The followers believe that Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, the sect’s founder, is Imam Mahdi contrary to what Sunni Muslims say that the prophet has yet to arrive.

In Malaysia, Ahmadiyyas are considered deviants because they differ in interpretation of certain concepts of Islam.

Ainul Yaqeen Muhammad Zain, who is the community’s leader in Kampung Nakhoda, said Muhammad was the last prophet who brought Islamic law to mankind but there will be others after him.

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